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Sexual Health Education Class 101 – STIs, Condoms & Safe Sex

I have decided it is time for some sexual health education, as it seems many people are lacking some knowledge in this area. Whether you are seeing a sex worker or not, your sexual health is something you shouldn’t take lightly. I definitely take it seriously and I take your sexual health seriously. I want to promote safe sex, whether you’re seeing a sex worker or just when it comes to sexual activity with any partner. It is up to you to take control of your sexual health.

One thing I have realised while working as a sex worker, is that so many guys want services such as oral or greek without a condom and will ask for it. What a lot don’t actually realise is the risk of STI from these things. This comes with having vaginal sex as well. While some choose to provide oral services with out condoms, I personally choose not to. This is because I want to reduce all possible risks of STI if I can. Please check out the links provided below for further information as I think its something that is important.

Prevention of catching, or spreading, an STI is critical, as they can result in serious health problems. Knowing the facts ensures that you make up your own mind about your body. Be aware of STIs, how you can prevent them, and what to do if you are to have unprotected/unsafe sex. Be aware of symptoms, if any, of STIs so that if you do have unsafe sex or if you just aren’t sure, see your doctor or sexual health clinic. There you can get tested or discuss it further.

REFERENCE – For more detailed information, information on sexual health clinics and detailed info on STIs please go to the following links – Don’t Risk an STI, Always wear a condom – Australian Government

Key Information to be aware of:-

What is a STI?

STI (Sexually Transmissible Infections) are passed on through sexual contact or the exchange of body fluids. Many people who have an STI don’t have any obvious symptoms or signs. So it’s important you get the facts about how they are spread and always have safe sex.

How are STI caused?

Like other infections or diseases, STI are caused by the spread of organisms like bacteria, viruses or parasites. STI caused by bacteria include chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis. STI caused by viruses include herpes, HIV, HPV and hepatitis B.

Do STI have symptoms?

Many people with an STI have no symptoms whatsoever, and they can only be diagnosed through testing. If signs and symptoms are present they may include things like:

•Unusual fluid from the penis, vagina or anus

•Itchiness around the genital area

•A burning sensation when urinating

•A rash, sores or small lumps on or around the penis, vagina or anus

•Unusual bleeding from the vagina after sex or between periods

•Pain and swelling in the testicles

•Pain during sex

•Sore throat, swollen glands, fever and body aches

•Unexplained tiredness, night sweats and weight loss

Do people who don’t sleep around still get STI?

STI don’t only happen to people with many sexual partners. Even if you are in a long-term relationship now, you or your partner may have been infected in a previous relationship without knowing it. With many STI, symptoms don’t show for months or even years. The only way to know for sure is to get a test.

Rising risks

Unfortunately, STI are more common than you might think. In 2012 chlamydia was the most frequently reported notifiable condition in Australia.

If left untreated STI can lead to serious and painful health consequences, ranging from infertility to cancer. For example, chlamydia and gonorrhoea can cause swelling and scarring of the fallopian tubes in females, which could lead to infertility. In males, the same complications might occur in the tubes leading from the testicles, which could also cause fertility problems, though it’s much less common. Syphilis can cause blindness, brain damage and heart disease. The good news is these three infections are easy to test for and to cure.

Groups most at risk

Anyone can get an STI, but they are most common in people between 15 and 29 years of age. The risk gets higher if you don’t always use condoms or have had many sexual partners.

Avoiding STI

Other than not having sex at all, condoms offer the best protection from STI. Always be prepared by carrying condoms with you. However, a condom is only effective when it covers the infected area. That’s why it’s important to also swap sexual histories with your partner (including whether you’ve had an STI or been tested for one) and to discuss whether you should be tested as a couple.

Condoms & Safe Sex

Excuses aren’t as strong as the reasons to use condoms

A considerable proportion (39%) of sexually active students reported they only used condoms ‘sometimes’ when they had sex, and a small (13%) but nonetheless notable proportion ‘never’ used condoms.

Some people may intend to use them but not have any in the heat of the moment. Studies show that 42% of young people don’t always carry condoms. Many others find it difficult to ask partners to use them, either through embarrassment or because they don’t know how to handle the more common excuses.

Do I need to use condoms in a long -term relationship?

If you are in a long-term relationship and want to have sex without condoms, we suggest that you and your partner get tested first. Remember that you may not see any obvious signs of an STI but you or your partner may have one and not know it. If you change partners you will need to use condoms again to stay safe.

Types of condoms (Condoms for males and females)

Condoms aren’t just for males to wear. The female condom is a thin sheath or pouch inserted into the vagina prior to intercourse. It lines the vagina and helps to prevent pregnancy and STI. Female condoms are a good option for people with latex allergy because they are made of polyurethane. Female condoms are available from pharmacies, family planning clinics, and some sexual health and female health clinics.

Using condoms properly

Should lubrication always be used with condoms?

Adequate lubrication makes sex more comfortable and helps prevent the condom breaking. Using a lubricant is recommended for anal sex. Water based lubricants are best. Oil-based lubricants like Vaseline and massage oil weaken latex condoms quickly, making them much more likely to leak or break.

Is wearing two condoms better than one?

No. Wearing two condoms creates tension and friction between the two layers, causing both to break. Wearing two condoms will also mean they don’t fit properly, making them more likely to slip off. Female condoms should also not be used at the same time as a male condom because of the potential for breakage.

Feeling confident about condoms

Let your partner know that you want to use condoms and why you feel it’s important well before the heat of the moment. If it’s unplanned sex simply say “Condom!” before things get too heavy.

Anyone who has had previous sexual contact can have an STI, even people with just one or two previous partners. Talking about using condoms doesn’t mean that you don’t trust your partner or that you have something to hide yourself, it just shows that you care about your health – and theirs.

Staying in control and handling excuses

Some partners may be reluctant to use condoms at first. Talk about it together but be clear and firm about the reasons why you want to be safe and use a condom.

If your partner still says no to condoms you should ask yourself if you’re prepared to risk your health by having unsafe sex. Your answer can be no too.

Drinking alcohol and taking other drugs may also affect your ability to make safe decisions.

 

At the end of the day, no matter who you are having sex with, whether its a sex worker, a casual fling, a partner, a hook up, Condoms are your best form of protection from STIs. Regular testing is important because some stis can have long term side effects and the potential to infect the person you choose to have sex with.

As a sex worker I always insist my gentlemen callers wear condoms for all services including oral. I provide condoms of all sizes along with lube because I take my sexual health and yours seriously. I get tested on a regular basis as well and I believe education is something everyone should find important. There are many places to learn about your sexual health.

 

Lets Talk Sexual Health…….. Again.

http://krissysmithaustralia.com/sexual-health-stop-asking-for-natural-services/

 

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